face

Templeton "Faceman" Peck on The A-Team.n., in role-playing games, a charismatic PC (or even NPC) who is always saddled with the ‘task’ of negotiating, interrogating, interviewing or haggling with NPCs because of interpersonal skills posessed by either the PC or the player or both. Also facemanmouth.

Submitted by:

Bryce Nakagawa

faction

Factions in EQ.EverQuest-ism
1. in general usage, a group, usu. contentious; from Middle French, from Latin faction, factio “act of making,” “to fashion.”
2. on EverQuest, a rating of how well a certain group of NPCs likes or dislikes a player character.
3. the fifteen Sigilian political groups from AD&D 2nd Edition’s spin-off Planetscape.

Addendum (def. #2): Whether you are able to enter a given town freely, or you are KoS by the town guard, depends largely on faction. A character’s faction is changed by the completion of quests or the killing of different mobs.

Submitted by:

Qit el-Remel

failing a random… encounter

phrase, to run into a person whom you dislike or try to avoid; Ex: (Mike enters room)”Oh no, we just failed a random Mike encounter!”

Addendum: This refers to the practice of rolling in D&D to check if your party runs into wandering monsters. My group modified it to refer to when a players’ brother, a monster-like being, would come out of his lair and randomly bump into us in the hallways of his house.

Submitted by:

John M. Gattus

Faire

Renaissance Faire.p.n., verbal shorthand for any of the Renaissance Faires held around the country. Always “Faire,” never “the Faire.” Ex: We were at Faire last year. Are you going to Faire this year? Also RenFaire, renfaire. See SCAer.

Addendum: “You know what’s wrong with this place? Well, the first thing that’s wrong is there’s no shit. I mean, that’s the thing about the past that people forget. All the shit. Animal shit. People shit. Cow shit. Horse shit. You waded through the stuff…. You should spray ’em all with shit as they come through the gates.” — 500-year-old Englishman Hob Gadling, criticizing the Renaissance Faire, from Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman #73.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

fairy

Faeries by artist Brian Froud.pl. n. fairies; adj. fay, fae; p.n. Faerie
1. n., in common usage, a mythical being of folklore and romance usually having diminutive human form and magic powers; from Middle English fairie “fairyland” “fairy people” (does not predate 14th century); from Old French faerie, from feie, fee “fairy”; from Latin Fata, Goddess of Fate, from fatum “fate.”
2. in fantasy fiction or gaming milieux, creatures inspired by European fairy lore; includes dryads, nymphs, pixies, brownies, gnomes, etc.
3. p.n., in European fairy lore, the physical location and/or spiritual realm containing the fairy homeland. Also Avalon, Avalonea.

Addendum: An incomplete list of alternate forms follows. Noun: (sing.) fairy, faerie, faery, (pl.) fairies, faeries, fae, fay, fairy-folk, faerie-folk, Fairy Court. Adjectives and adverbs: fae, fay, fairy-like. Also sidh (pronounced “shee”), from Gaelic daonie sidh (pronounced “theena shee”) “fairy court”; Little People, Good People, Good Folk, Seelie Court, Unseelie Court, elf.

Addendum #2: “Faerie” is the preferred spelling for gamer/fantasy/mythology afficianados. Faeries are one of the few major fantasy milieu concepts not lifted from Tolkien (although one can argue that Goldberry the River Spirit was close).

Submitted by:

Gregory Folsom, Kunochan

familiar

A female magic-user, with her pseudo-dragon familiar.pl. n. familiars
1. n., in general usage, a demon that attends a witch, said to assume the form of an animal; also familiar spirit; Middle English famulier, from Latin familiāris “of a household”; c. 1300.
2. in standard fantasy and occult milieux, a magical animal or animal spirit, often with the power of speech, that acts as a servant to a spellcaster.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

fan art

n., artwork created by an amateur artist, based on characters or situations in a favorite science fiction or fantasy novel, film, comic book, anime or game; sometimes used derogatorily, as some fan art can be rather bad. Ex: Look at that heinous cover! It looks like fan art! See also fan fiction.

Addendum: Check out Amazingly Bad Fan Art.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

fan fiction

abbrev. fanfic
n., fiction created by an amateur writer, based on characters or situations in a favorite science fiction or fantasy novel, film, comic book, anime or game; sometimes used derogatorily to refer to bad sci-fi or fantasy, as fan fiction is often rather bad. Ex: Did you read the new Piers Anthony? I thought I was reading a fanfic! Fanfic that presents the characters in homosexual relationships is called slash. See fan art.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

fan service

They totally need to be dressed and posed that way. For the story.n. in science fiction, fantasy, horror, comic book, and video game media, and sometimes in games, content included specifically for the purpose of pleasing serious fans of the property or genre; term originates from manga and anime fandom, to refer to artists’ pandering to fans, particularly the inclusion of bikini-clad girls and of references to other anime or manga titles; from Japanese ファンサービス fan sabisu from English; c. 1970s. Also fanservice, service cut (サービスカット sabisu katto). Ex: Oh please, you think the Gelatinous Cube makes sense in the Pathfinder universe? It’s just there as fanservice for old D&D geeks.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

fanboy

The first image that comes up on the GIS search. Poor bastard.pl. n. fanboys
n., a mildly derogatory term for an avid fan of any particular type of science fiction or fantasy lierature, comic, movie, or game; often preceded by “drooling” as an intensifier. Ex: I am NOT going to a Trek convention. The thought of being surrounded by drooling fanboys scares me. See otaku.

Addendum: Characterized by their tendency to cluster with other fanboys, their lack of personal hygiene, and their inability to think about anything outside the context of the focus of their fannishness.

Submitted by:

Brian A. LaBounty

fanny fatigue

n., the inevitable result of sitting around a gaming table for six to eight hours straight; often relieved with a butt break.

Submitted by:

Brian Curtis

fantasy

Warhammer Online.pl. n. fantasies; adj. fantastic
1. n., in general usage, a creation of the imaginative faculty whether expressed or merely conceived; as a fanciful design or invention, a chimerical or fantastic notion; Middle English fantasie “mental image,” Latin phantasia  “idea”; c. 1300.
2. imaginative fiction featuring especially strange settings and grotesque characters; also fantasy fiction.
3. in gamerese, a catch-all name for any game milieu directly or indirectly inspired by the pseudo-medieval Anglo-Saxon mythological setting of JRR Tolkien’s fantasy fiction; such milieux usu. feature quasi-medieval technology and social structure, terrain similar to that of medieval Europe, magic systems based on European Hermetics, and fantasy creatures from European mythology and/or Tolkien’s literature. See Tolkienesque.
4. any game milieu or fictionalized setting in which magic is a reality.

Addendum: Examples of games that take place in a fantasy milieu include: Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, Rolemaster, GURPS Fantasy, ShadowrunMiddle Earth Role-Playing (MERP), World of WarcraftWarhammer Fantasy Battle, and Magic: The GatheringAlthough technically fantasy, occult-based games such as Call of Cthulhu and the World of Darkness games are usually not referred to by this term.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

farmer

v. to farm, farming
in MMORPGs, a player who grinds for the sole purpose of collecting in-game items, often to sell them to other players for real money. See gold farmer.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

FASA Corporation

The FASA-published Shadowrun RPG.p.n., (“foss uh”) a former role-playing and wargaming company, based in Chicago; from “Freedonian Aeronautics and Space Administration.”

Addendum #1: From the (now extinct) FASA web site: “Founded by Jordan Weisman and L. Ross Babcock III, FASA Corporation is a leading developer and manufacturer of RPG products, miniatures and miniatures games. FASA Corporation has been creating successful game worlds since 1980. The current lines include BattleTech®, Shadowrun®, VOR: The Maelstrom™ and Crimson Skies™.”

Addendum #2: The name of the company is often treated as an acronym: “Foul-ups (or Fuck-ups) Are Standard Attachments.” This is based on the fact that almost every FASA publication will have a table in it some where that is completely screwed up. In most cases, the screw-ups are columns shifted to the right or left; some times, they are worse, such as half of a table being intermixed with a table from a different page.

Addendum #3: FASA Inc. is no more. They closed their doors April 2001, their various game lines sold to repay debt. WizKids & FanPro are doing the Battletech lines (the former doing a MageKnight version of Btech, the latter doing the old style of Btech); Catalyst Game Labs currently does Shadowrun.

Submitted by:

Kunochan, Scott Burkhardt, Dave Mescher

FASERIP

acronym, “Fighting, Agility, Strength, Endurance, Reason, Intelligence, and Psyche”; (“fay zer rip” or “fayz rip”) in the Marvel Super Heroes RPG, a mnemonic device to remember the seven primary character stats.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

FATAL

The cover of FATAL, second ed.abbrev. “Fantasy Adventure To Adult Lechery”; a fantasy role-playing game system released in 2002 by creator Byron Hall; generally considered to be the worst RPG system ever produced.

Addendum: Don’t take my word for it — read the famous review on RPG.net. It’s worth the time. The PDF file of the original FATAL is available online at various locations — I can’t link to it because of the Amazon Associates terms. Damn terms.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

Fëanor

1. p.n., in Tolkien’s The Silmarillion, the Lord of the Noldor, or Deep Elves; he created the Silmarils and led the Noldor in their rebellion against the Valar.
2. in fantasy RPGs, any character, esp. an elf, who suddenly breaks alignment and starts randomly killing people.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

feat

pl. n. feats
1. n., in general usage, an achievement that requires great courage, skill, or strength; from Middle English fait, fet, Latin factum “do”; 14th c.
2. n., in Dungeons & Dragons and related role-playing game systems, such as d20 and Pathfinder,  a type of character ability that represents a special skill or training; contrasted with ordinary skills in that feats often do not require a success roll; also, feats are not ranked. See “Feats don’t fail me now.”

Addendum: Feats were introduced in 3rd Edition Dungeons & Dragons, and carried through to 4th Ed.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

Feats don’t fail me now!

phrase, in 3rd. ed. Dungeons & Dragons, uttered when a character is using one of his or her feats.

Addendum: From “Feets don’t fail me now,” a famous little bit of racist paleo-ebonics, the original source of which I have been unable to determine.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

FedEx run

pl. n. FedEx runs
n., a quest or assignment in a computer or tabletop RPG, in which the characters must find an object and deliver it somewhere else in order to collect payment; named for the Memphis, Tennessee-based delivery company.

Addendum: Usually considered a waste of time as FedEx runs rarely advance the plot, and are often a form of busy work while the GM comes up with a better idea for an adventure.

Submitted by:

Matthew Cary