gadgeteer

Reed Richards as gadgeteer.pl. n. gadgeteers
in super-hero gaming milieux, a character whose powers are based on various technological items, usu. invented by the character; examples from comics include Dr. Octopus and Iron Man (who is also a tin can). See also brick, bullet, energy projector, mentalist, speedster.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

gadzookery

pl. n. gadzookeries
n., the use of archaic speech, as in an historical novel, or a role-playing game, or Faire. Also gadzooksism.

Addendum: “When writer John Vernon damned gadzookery as ‘the bane of historical fiction’ he was referring to the use of archaisms, such as gadzooks, prithee, and wellaway, in his own genre of historical fiction. As you might have guessed, gadzookery comes from gadzooks, a mild oath that may have originated in ‘God’s hooks,’ a reference to the nails of the crucifixion.” — Merriam Webster’s “Word for the Wise”

Submitted by:

Kunochan

gambit

Just Natalie Portman playing chess.pl. n. gambits
1. in chess, an opening tactic by the White player in which a minor piece, usu. a pawn, is sacrificed to gain some kind of advantage; if the Black player does the same thing, this is a countergambit; from Italian dare il gambetto (“to trip someone”), from gamba “leg”, Latin gamba “calf”; 1561.
2. in games, any tactic involving the loss of something in exchange for a benefit.
3. in general usage, and in games, any tactic or stratagem.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

game

The games wall at Toys 'R' Us.pl. games, v. to game, gaming, gamed; n. gamer
1. n.,  in general use, a form of play or sport, esp. a competitive one played according to rules and decided by skill, strength, or luck; from Anglo-Saxon gamen “joy, fun, amusement”; c. 1300.
2. v., in general use, to gamble. Ex: I’m going gaming in Monte Carlo.
3. n., in gamer jargon, a hobbyist game. Ex: Sure, Monopoly is a game, but it’s not a real game!
4. v., in gamer jargon, to engage in game-playing. Ex: I’m gaming at the con all weekend.
5. n., see gamer.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

game mechanic

pl n. game mechanics
n., a game rule that determines the outcome of a player action. Pretty much syn. with “rule,” except that game mechanics tend to belong to classes or types of rules that exist across games. Examples:  secret unit deployment, modular board.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

game on

phrase or excl., “Game on!”; in LARPs, used to announce that game play is beginning, and from that point on everyone should be in character, and that game rules now apply; some groups use “game off” to indicate the opposite.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

game time

n., measurement of the passage of time in the milieu or world of a game; as opposed to the actual, literal passage of time according to the clock on the wall.

Addendum: Game time has a rather elastic quality. On the one hand, a furious round of combat that, in game time, lasts only a few seconds, can last hours of real time. On the other hand, a voyage aboard a ship that takes two weeks of game time might take only a matter of seconds in real time.

Submitted by:

Mark Whitley

game world

Map of the World of Greyhawk, the original D&D game world.pl. game worlds; also gameworld, gameworlds
n., the characteristics of the play-setting for a role-playing game or wargame, which can include any of the following: physical location and climate; indigenous vegetation  animal, and sentient life; technological advancement and available equipment; social, economic, and governmental structures, including laws and mores; and the presence of psionics, superpowers, magic, or other paranormal powers. See milieu.

Addendum: The “world” in “game world” is a little inaccurate, as a game world might be as small as a single city where the player characters live, or as large as an entire universe having innumerable populated planets.

Submitted by:

Mark Whitley

game wrap

also game wrap-up, postgame
n. at a LARP session, a meeting of the players and storytellers held after the session ends; players give each other “shout-outs,” usually for experience points, and game announcements are made.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

gamemaster

Gamemaster leading a role-playing game.pl. n. gamemasters; also game master, Game Master, abbrev. GM; v. to gamemaster, gamemastering, gamemastered
n. in a role-playing game, the player who controls events, determines outcomes, and referees the players, rather than controlling a player character. Also dungeon master, referee, storyteller.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

gamer

Gamers.pl. gamers; also v. to gamegaming, gamed.
1. n., one who plays games.
2. specifically, one who plays games of specific hobbyist genres, namely role-playing games, wargames, strategic simulations, indie board and card games, and strategy & collectible card games; also computer-based variants of these games.
3. v. to game, the act of playing a game. Ex: Sorry, I can’t go on a date — I’m gonna be gaming all weekend.
4. n. gaming, hobbyist games as a field of interest, or as an industry. Ex: I used to go on dates, until I got into gaming.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

gamer crack

1. n., Magic: The Gathering, in reference to its expense and addictive qualities. Also crack cards. Also Magic: The Addiction.
2. a drink made from Gatorade and up to a full package of Pixie Stixs; used on nights when caffeine just isn’t good enough (the effect on a generally malnourished LARPer is scary to say the least). See Gamer Juice.

Submitted by:

Brian A. LaBounty, Brian R. Goudie

gamer disadvantage

n., refers to the the habits, jargon, and shibboleths of gamers; see LARPishness, meldar.

Addendum: While not a liability when communicating with others in the gaming circle, the negative impact of the “gamer disadvantage” manifests when gamers communicate with straights, mixing gaming terms with normal speech. Gamer: “So I was holding my one year old and reaching for the sippy cup on the top shelf when I failed my Dex check and nearly dropped her. Fortunately I was able to spend a Karma point, otherwise the kid could have taken agg damage from the toys on the floor and I know my wife wouldn’t have made her Save Versus Anger roll.” Straight: [Stunned, perplexed, speechless] Gamer: “Dang, looks like you reacted to that at -4.”

Submitted by:

Mark Whitley

Gamer Juice

Steven Seagal has an energy drink?n., energy drinks; the more sugar and caffeine, the better. See gamer crack.

Submitted by:

Rob Ritchie, Kunochan

gamer SO

The gamer SO.abbrev., gamer “significant other”; the boyfiend or girlfriend of a gamer, who shows up to games just to hang out with their significant other; usu. pretends to be interested in playing the game, and ends up being a negative or distracting influence.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

Games Workshop

Games Workshop.p.n., a UK-based game company with offices in Maryland, founded in 1975, specializing in wargaming and miniatures , but also producing related board games, role-playing games, computer games and fiction; creators of Warhammer  and Warhammer 40,000, along with countless other games, most famously Blood Bowl andSpace Hulk.

Addendum: Games Workshop games vary in quality as far as game play, but my god, the art is always gorgeous.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

Gandalf

Instead of giving you Sir Ian McKellen for the umpteenth time, here's the Bakshi Gandalf.pl. Gandalves(?)
1. p.n., Gandalf Greyhame, wizard protagonist of JRR Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings; also Gandalf the Grey, Gandalf the White, Incánus, Mithrandir, Olórin, Tharkûn, The Grey Pilgrim, Stormcrow.
2. in gamerese, can refer to any mage character, particularly one with Gandalf-like features: grey robe, giant pointy hat, tall magic staff, long white beard, and a predilection for very short hairy men.

Addendum: “Gandalf” means “wand elf,” and was the name of a dwarf (Gandálfr) in the Gyfaginning, part of the Prose Edda of Snorri Sturlson.

LEGO® Lord of the Rings™ Gandalf™ Arrives

Submitted by:

Kunochan

gank

v. to gank, ganking, ganked
v., to kill, often in a sneaky or surreptitious manner. Ex: I was trying to go fishing, when I was suddenly ganked by a mob.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

ganking

v. to gank, ganking, ganked
1. gerund, in games, the act of killing. Ex: I was almost all the way to the Well of Souls when my thief got ganked.
2. in online games, esp. MMORPGs, the act of killing a player character, esp. as an act of griefing; see PvP. Ex: I was in the Everwoods ganking n00bs when some asshole moderator banned me from the game!

Submitted by:

Kunochan

garden weasel

The Garden Weasel.1. in general usage, The Garden-Weasel™, a well-known lawn & garden invention that’s been advertised on TV and sold since 1976.
2. in gamerese, a high-level AD&D ranger or ranger-type character.

Addendum: so-called for the combination of their ability to attack many times per round and their eco-mindedness.

Submitted by:

Michelle Elbert