kack

v., to kack, kacking, kacked
v., onomatopoeia, to cause massive amounts of damage; to kill in a quick and messy fashion. Ex: So Shadowdrake was waiting for the troll to come around the corner and he rolled really well on backstab and just KACKED him!

Submitted by:

Kunochan

ke ke

also keke
(“keh keh”) in online games, equiv. of “ha ha” or laughter; from Korean, an Anglicization of the Hangul character used to represent laughter (). Ex: Player One: “ZERG RUSH!!!!!” Player Two: “Oh crap!” Player One: “Ke ke ke ke ke.”

Addendum: Seems to have originated in online StarCraft games.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

Key to Endless Adventure, The

D&D-ism
phrase, a former official marketing catch-phrase for Dungeons & Dragons; usu. quoted sarcastically. Ex: Player 1: “Jesus Christ, this scenario is taking forever!” Player 2: “It’s The Key to Endless Adventure!”

Submitted by:

Kunochan

keyword

Note the keyword "flying."pl. n. keywords
n., in Magic: The Gathering, one or two word phrases on game cards that indicate the abilities of that card; the meanings of the keywords are explained in the game rules. “Evergreen” keywords appear in the core card sets and may appear throughout any set in the game.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

kibblerize

v., to kibblerize, kibblerizing, kibblerized
v., to chop, hack, blow up or rip a character or monster to bloody, bite-sized shreds, usually by dealing out massive damage instantly or in a relatively short time; from kibble “ground-up meat in pet food.” Ex.: His elf jumped into the room and got instantly kibblerized by the waiting orcs. Also steak tartar. See also gib.

Submitted by:

Christina Waldeck

kibitzer

A full-fledged member of the kibitzer union.pl. n. kibitzers; v. to kibitz, kibitzing, kibitzed
1. n., in general usage, an onlooker at a card game who gives unsolicited advice; from Yiddish kibetsn, German kiebitzen “to look on at cards,” from Kiebitz  “busybody”: c. 1925. Do not confuse with kibbutz.
2. in gamerese, a non-player who interferes with a game session, usually by offering inappropriate advice. Ex: “Put all your dice on #12, she gives you two resources and a die chit!” “Dammit Rob, stop kibitzing!” “Fine! I’ll just go live on a kibbutz, a communal farm in Israel!” “Fine, you do that!”

Submitted by:

Kunochan

killer dice

sing. n. killer die
that special twenty-sider the DM has which rolls far too many criticals against PCs. Also Paladin Killer.

Addendum: So named for the slightly faded orange die used by a hardcore DM, under whom I played for three years, which had a tendency for criticals against PCs in general and paladins (my predominant character type) in particular.

Submitted by:

Landon Schurtz

Killer GM

pl. n. killer GMs
n., in role-playing games, a gamemaster who enjoys subjecting characters to unreasonably dangerous scenarios, often with the goal of killing off the characters. See TPK.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

kindergoth

pl. n. kindergoths
1. n., a young or inexperienced LARPer. See also newbie.
2. a gamer who was introduced to gaming with the White Wolf games, as opposed to “the classics” (the opposite of a paleogamer). See gloom cookie.

Submitted by:

Brian R. Goudie

kingmaker

pl. n. kingmakers
n., in tabletop board and wargames, a player who is not winning, but whose actions can determine which of the other players will win.

 

Submitted by:

Kunochan

kite

EverQuest-ism
in MMORPGs, the practice of pulling a mob while enhancing one’s own speed and/or reducing that mob’s speed; then running a fair distance away, casting several damaging spells at it, and running away again before the monster enters melee range. See also reverse-kiting, anti-kiting, and quad-kiting.

Addendum: The effect when viewed is much like the character leading the mob like a kite on a string; hence, the term. This practice is often looked down upon by many EQ players, as the monster may aggro on PC passersby, resulting in said passerby’s death.

Addendum #2: Kiting allows a character to kill a mob of a higher level than s/he could normally and with low risk to him/herself.

Submitted by:

Dave Shepherd

kitsune

Sexy kitsune cosplay FTW.pl. n. kitsune (never “kistunes”)
n. (“kee tsew nay”), in Japanese Shinto folklore, shapeshifting foxes or fox spirits that can assume human form (sometimes with a fox’s tail), servants of the goddess Inari Okami; they are highly intelligent tricksters, have magical powers (prophecy, illusion, breath weapon, flight, invisibility), and can be good (zenko) or evil (yako); as the kitsune grow older and more powerful, they grow extra tails, and the most powerful have nine tails (kyubi no kitsune); Japanese 狐 kitsune (origin disputed). See tanuki.

Addendum: Game kitsune include the Vulpix (Japanese ロコン rokon) and Ninetales (キュウコン kyukon) in  Pokémon; the Ninetails and Moonlight Flower in Ragnarok Online; Tails in the Sonic the Hedgehog video games; Ninetails in the wonderful game Ōkami; the Kitsune were-foxes in Werewolf: the Apocalypse; and the various kitsune-themed cards in Magic: The Gathering.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

klick

pl. n. klicks
abbrev., in military parlance (and therefore in military-themed games), one kilometer. Ex: Alright, Green Falcon Leader, send your mechs five clicks up the road and wait for my signal.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

knight

A real knight from Chaucer (L); a modern fantasy green sexy knight from Knight Online (R).pl. n. knights; v. to knight, knighting, knighted; adj. knighted; also n. knighthood
1. n., in medieval Europe, a mounted warrior granted an honorary title by a monarch as a reward for, or in exchange for, military service; often a member of an organized order of knights (such as the Knights Templar or the Order of the Garter); closely associated with chivalry and jousting; from Middle English knightknigt, or cnigt “military follower,” Old English cniht “youth, servant”; c. 1100.
2. n., in chess, a piece in the game, usu. represented by a horse’s head and neck; c. 1440.

Addendum: Of course fantasy games often incorporate knights; Dungeons & Dragons 3rd ed. offers knight as a character class; the death knight is a unit in the Warcraft RTS games and a hero class in the MMORPG World of WarcraftWarhammer Fantasy Battles has knights errant units; and the various Star Wars games have Jedi knights. See paladin.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

kobold

A kobold in World of Warcraft. "You no take candle!"pl. n. kobolds
1. a fairy spirit or goblin, often mischievous; in some stories haunts houses, in others mines and underground places; from Middle High German kobolt “goblin”; c. 17th c.
2. in Dungeons & Dragons, small, humanoid, reptillian, orc-like creatures that are very easy to kill. Aldo urd.
3. in fantasy gaming milieux, small, easily killed monsters based on the kobolds of D&D; examples include the kobolds of the Warcraft universe, which are subterranean rat-like creatures who wear candles; and in EverQuest, kobolds are short half-canine half-gorilla deals.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

KOS

EverQuest-ism
abbrev. “kill on sight”; on EverQuest, refers to a character having a faction with given NPCs so bad that they will aggro on the character as soon as they see him. Ex: I can’t go to Oggok; I’m KoS to the city guards.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

KPAU

acronym, “Kindred politics as usual”; (“kapow”) in reference to White Wolf Games’ Vampire: The Masquerade; to indicate disbelief and/or resignation to the actions or mentality of others in a game.

Addendum: The gothic horror RPG Vampire: The Masquerade is less about vampires hunting victims and more about the inter-clan politics of the game’s vampire society, which is often machiavellian in the extreme.

Submitted by:

Michelle Elbert

kraken

A kraken miniature from Warhammer Fantasy Battles.pl. n. kraken (sometimes krakens); also p.n. Kraken
1. in Norse mythology, a giant sea monster that consumes men, ships, and even whales; often imagined in later literature as a colossal squid-like creature; from Norwegian kraken, krake “twisted animal” + –n “the”; c. 1850.
2. in Dungeons & Dragons, an 80-foot long squid-like monster; intelligent neutral evil creatures that dwell in underwater caverns and breed humans as slaves; c. 1983.
3. in the original Final Fantasy video game, one of the four final bosses (Japanese クラーケン Kurāken), a humanoid squid creature that uses an Ink spell to blind the party; c. 1987.

Addendum: Kraken also appear in a number of games, including World of WarcraftGuild WarsResistance 2, Magic: The Gathering, and Warhammer 40,000.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

KS

EverQuest-ism
abbrev., “kill steal”; on EverQuest, refers to the practice of attacking a mob that is already in combat with other characters, and inflicting more damage on it than the characters who first attacked it. Also KSing, KSer.

Addendum: Since the mechanics of the game allow looting of a slain mob’s corpse by only the character or group who inflicted the most damage on it, and only give experience for the kill to the same character or group, this practice is much reviled by most players of the game.

Submitted by:

Brian A. LaBounty