lag

also v., to lag, lagging, lagged
1. v., in general usage, to fail to maintain an expected pace; from Norwegian lagga “to go slowly”; c. 1500.
2. n., in online gaming, when a game does not respond in a timely manner to the player’s commands, usually due to a slow internet connection, server latency or overworked hardware.
3. in offline gaming, any delay or downtime.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

lamia

An animated lamia sprite.pl. n.  lamiae (“lamias” is incorrect); p.n. Lamia
1. p.n. Lamia, in Greek mythology, a beautiful queen of Libya and mistress of Zeus, who was transformed by Hera into a child-devouring demon; in later traditions, lamiae are seductive, vampiric succubi; Greek Lámia, from laimos “gullet”; c. 14th century.
2. Lamia, an 1819 poem by John Keats, which described Lamia as having a serpent’s tail below the waist. See naga.
3. n., in Dungeons & Dragons, a creature with the lower body of a lion, and the upper torso, arms, and head of a human female; the lamia noble was described as a woman with a snake’s tail below the waist, like Keats’ Lamia and the naga; in 4th ed. D&D, the lamia was re-imagined, for some reason, as a swarm of insects that hollows out a demi-human corpse and wears it as a disguise; c. 1977.
4. in fantasy gaming milieux, a monster inspired by Keats’ Lamia; examples include the lamiae (Japanese ラミア ramia), Lamia Queen, and Lamia Matriarch in the Final Fantasy video game series; the lamia in God of War; and World of Warcraft has considered adding a lamia inspired by D&D’s leonine creature.

Addendum: Fuck yeah, lamias! [NSFW]

Submitted by:

Kunochan

lammy

pl. n. lammies
n., an item card (a card containing a description of an in-character item, such as a weapon) in a LARP, so called as the card often comes covered in a protective laminated sleeve. Also tag. See lammy grabberinventory.

Submitted by:

Andrew Davies

lammy grabber

pl. n. lammy grabbers
n., a LARP player with the annoying habit of stealing in-game items from other players, just because the item is represented by a laminated card. See lammy.

Addendum: Lammy grabbers show sudden interest in an item for no IC reason, but only the OOC reason that they can see the item card; a LARP variety of metagamer.

Submitted by:

Andrew Davies

language-dependent

A sexy Pathfinder sorcerer.adj., in d20-based role-playing games such as Pathfinder, describes a spell with a verbal component, such that the target of the spell must hear and understand the words spoke by the caster, or the magic fails. Ex: “I cast Porcine Form, and sing out ‘I say that you are such a prig / that now thou shalt become a pig!” “Sorry, I don’t speak Common. I gut you with my short sword instead. Oink.”

 

lanternjaw

A lantern-jawed paladin.pl. n. lanternjaws; also adj. lantern-jawed
1. adj., having a very pronounced and/or squared chin and/or jaw.
2. n., in fantasy role-playing games, an amusingly overplayed paladin character.

Addendum: Usually sounds like Dudley Do-Right speaking bad Middle English.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

LARP

Vampire LARPers.also n. LARPer, v. to LARPLARPing, LARPed; adj. LARPishness
1. acronym “live-action role-playing”; n., a sub-genre of role-playing games, closely related to free-form or diceless role-playing, in which players tend to act-out or perform their character interactions, often in a suitable setting or environment and often in costume, rather than discussing game play around a table; often refers specifically to the Mind’s Eye Theater games published by White Wolf Games. See boffer LARP, theater style LARP, immersion LARP, parlor LARP. Compare with tabletop role-playing game.
3. LARPer, n., one who plays LARPs.


Submitted by:

Kunochan

LARPishness

also adj. LARPish
n., characterized by the seemingly odd or foolish behavior exhibited by LARPers, as viewed by non-players who may not understand that a game is being played. Ex: We’re gonna be playing on campus, so I don’t want any LARPishness where the straights might see it — we don’t wanna get complaints and lose our permit!

Submitted by:

Kunochan

law

I am the law!sometimes the law; pl. n. laws; adj. lawful, lawless; adv. lawfully; p.n. The Law
1. n., a set of formal rules, usu. proscribing certain conduct, set down and enforced by a polity or community; or an individual rule in that set;  from Old English lag, Old Norse lǫg “law”; predates 12th c.
2. in religious mythology, describes rules imagined to have been dictated by the gods or other divine powers.
3. in fantasy milieux, a supernatural force or faction, often composed of gods, spirits, supernatural creatures, and mortals, dedicated to promoting peace and order, and countering the forces of chaos; examples include the Valar and their forces in Tolkien’s legendarium, and the White Lords of Law in the Eternal Champion stories of Michael Moorcock.
4. adj., in the D&D alignment system, one point on the alignment matrix; the opposite of “chaos.” See lawful good, lawful neutral, lawful evil.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

lawful evil

For the greater good. I want to do what must be done.n., adj., in Dungeons & Dragons, the alignment of a character that serves the forces of law, but also evil. See also lawful goodneutral goodchaotic goodlawful neutraltrue neutralchaotic neutralneutral evilchaotic evil.

Addendum: Lawful evil is the alignment of real-world hedge fund managers, televangelists, and some sociopaths. This person adheres to the law, and even to codes of religious conduct and social propriety — but these laws are a system to be exploited, not a system to serve others. The goal of the lawful evil character is self-aggrandizement and personal power (or, in a fantasy milieu, to serve evil or corrupt powers for the purposes of self-aggrandizement and personal power); and this person will use the power that comes from government, bureaucracy, organized religion, the military, or any other established hierarchy to get it. They willingly serve the hierarchy, but their motivations are purely evil.

There is a second take on the lawful evil character, which applies to examples such as Darth Vader and the Empire in Star Wars, or to Fascists and Communists in real life. In this take, the character genuinely believes that law, order, and peace are paramount above all other considerations; and he or she is willing to perform any sort of monstrous action if they believe it will promote those goals. One can argue, however, that this is actually closer to lawful neutral.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

lawful good

Truth, justice, and the American way. And he's not even American. He's an undocumented alien.n., adj., in Dungeons & Dragons, the alignment of a character that serves the forces of law and good. See also neutral goodchaotic goodlawful neutraltrue neutralchaotic neutrallawful evilneutral evilchaotic evil.

Addendum: Lawful good characters are bound by a strict moral and ethical code that proscribes and prescribes their behavior; they may also be punished by supernatural forces if they fail to act in a certain way. They are required to proactively uphold the law and seek the common good; protect the innocent; hunt down and punish evil creatures; and support the established hierarchy  as long as that hierarchy is committed to law and good. It should be noted that “law” and “good” don’t always coincide, which can be a problem for a lawful good character.

In terms of party cohesion, lawful good characters can be just as bad, if not worse, than chaotic evil characters, as they tend to ignore the party’s decisions in favor of quick, decisive action towards what they see as “right.”

Submitted by:

Kunochan

Lawful Good Rules Lawyer

pl. p. n. Lawful Good Rules Lawyers
p.n., in role-playing games, a player who informs the gamemaster of game rules that would be detrimental to the player or the party; see rules lawyer, lawful goodalignment.

GM: “Okay Sara, your critical hit will destroy the vampire.”
Sara: “Um…undead are immune to critical hits. He only takes a third of that damage.”
GM: “Thanks for reminding me! The vampire turns into mist and disappears behind the crack under the door.”
Bob: “What the hell did you tell him that for?! Whose side are you on anyway?!”
Sara: “I’m on the side of truth. What side are you on?”
Bob: “%@#$ Lawful Good Rules Lawyer!”

Submitted by:

Frank Steven Gimenez

lawful neutral

Mega City One. 800 million people living in the ruin of the old world and the mega structures of the new one. Only one thing fighting for order in the chaos: judges. n., adj., in Dungeons & Dragons, the alignment of a character that serves the forces of law, disregarding notions of good and evil. See also lawful goodneutral goodchaotic goodtrue neutralchaotic neutrallawful evilneutral evilchaotic evil.

Addendum: The lawful neutral character places law, peace, order and stability above all other concerns. He or she does not care if the law is benevolent, or even fair — the law is the law, and it must be obeyed. This alignment is often applied to characters who follow some sort of strict religious, legal, or personal code, that they believe is inerrant and must never be questioned.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

Lawful Stupid

n., the default alignment for paladins; describes a character who does what is ‘right’ even when it is dumb and/or suicidal; parody of D&D alignments; see stupid paladin.

Submitted by:

Mike Fortey

lead

An unpainted lead miniature.pl. n. leads (“leddz”)
n., (“ledd”) syn. of miniature. Ex: Can I borrow your elven fighter? I forgot to bring my leads. Also lead miniature, lead figurine, lead figure.

Addendum: So called because they are made of lead, or a lead alloy. Even the plastic ones will be referred to as “leads.”

Submitted by:

Kunochan

leadhead

pl. n. leadheads
n., a miniatures or wargaming aficionado. See lead, treadhead, grognard.

Submitted by:

Bryce Nakagawa

league

pl. n. leagues
n., any of various units of distance from about 3.9 to 7.4 kilometers; an anachronistic unit of measurement often used in medieval fantasy gaming milieux; from Middle English leuge, lege, from Late Latin leuga; c. 14th century. See also stadium.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

lethal damage

n., damage in some role-playing rules systems that represents broken bones or gaping wounds, and other more critical physical trauma; to differentiate from lesser wounds. See also critical hitaggravated damage.

Submitted by:

Brian Wade

lethality index

n., an imagined description of a role-playing or wargaming character’s effectiveness, used to refer to minmaxing or torquing. Ex: “My minotaur kicks ass — I maximized his lethality index by purchasing useless disads like ‘Fear of Bovines.’” “Um, bulls are bovines.” “So? What’s your point?”

Submitted by:

Duane

level

A gamer merit badge.pl. n. levels; also v. to level, leveling, leveled
1. n., in games, esp. computer and tabletop RPGs, a stat measuring a character’s general standing in regards to power, strength, and experience, usu. designed to recognize growth through achievement over time; also, a measure of the power of a monster, creature, or inanimate object or barrier; also, a measurement of the power of a spell, magical effect, or technological item. Ex: “Your level one paladin wants to ‘arrest’ my 8th level rogue? Fat chance!” See experience points, hit dice.
2. v. to level, the act of progressing a character to the next level. Ex: I’ve been trying to level up my fighter for months, but Josh never gives out XP!
2. in older dungeon crawl RPGs, the individual storeys of an underground dungeon, each deeper level assumed to be more challenging than the previous.
3. in video games, an individual area or chapter of a game, each assumed to be more challenging than the previous, and each usually ending with a fight against a boss.

Submitted by:

Kunochan