n-sider

This pic is everywhere online, so I'm just gonna use it.pl. n. n-siders
n., refers to a die, where n is always replaced by a number, usually 4,6,8,10,12, or 20; a polyhedral die with the stated number of flat faces; also n-sided dien-sided dice. Ex: Okay, roll two ten-sided dice and one six-sider. See xdn.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

naga

A statue of Lady Vashj, the naga sea witch from World of Warcraft.pl. n. naga (sometimes “nagas” is used, but is incorrect); f.n. nagi
1. in Hindu mythology (and borrowed by Buddhist mythology), a variety of deity that assumes the form of a great snake, or a creature with the upper body of a human and the lower body of a snake; they can be good or evil, and can offer boons (including immortality) or cause disasters; they are the enemies of eagles; “naga” can also be used to refer to a snake that takes human form; in Buddhism, naga are closely associated with, or the same as dragons; in Southeast Asia, “naga” may refer to a many-headed dragon; Sanskri नाग nāgá “cobra,” Proto-Indo-European snēg-o “snake” (same origin as English “snake”); c. 18th century.
2. in Dungeons & Dragons, one of the original monsters, a large snake with a humanoid head; intelligent creatures of varying alignments; varieties include dark naga, guardian naga, spirit naga, water naga, bone naga, ha-nagabanelar, and nagahydra (a naga + hydra hybrid); c. 1974. See also medusalamia.
3. in fantasy and occult gaming milieux, various creatures inspired by the Hindu naga, including the nagas in the Earthdawn RPG, and the CORPG Guild Wars; the Nagah weresnakes in Werewolf: the Apocalypse; the Nizari in EverQuest 2; and in Vampire: The Masquerade, the Serpentis discipline Form of the Cobra allows Followers of Set to assume a naga-like form.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

naked

adj., in tabletop miniatures games, describes a unit introduced into game play “as-is,” with no upgrades.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

namárië

(“nam our’ ee ay”) “farewell”; from Elven Quenya; used by Tolkien fans. See also pedo mellon a minno, elen síla lúmenn omentielvo.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

nanopunk

The Nanites from MST3K.n., adj., a sub-genre of the cyberpunk science fiction sub-genre, characterized by future scenarios in which society has been dramatically affected by the development of nanotechnology.

Addendum: The seminal novel of nanopunk literature is Neal Stephenson’s 1996 The Diamond Age: Or, a Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer; also check out Rudy Rucker’s four-volume The Ware Tetralogy.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

nanotechnology

A hypothesized nanotech device in the bloodstream.Also n. nanotech, nano; adj. nanotechnological
1. in materials engineering, the manipulation of matter on the atomic and molecular scales; from Greek nano– “dwarf” + techno– “craft, method” + –logy “science,” coined in 1974 by Japanese physicist Norio Taniguchi.
2. in science fiction milieux, a near- or far-future set of technologies based on molecular machines, self-sufficient molecular robots (nanobots or nanites) that operate at the nanoscale (1-100 nanometers); such machines are imagined to construct any material object from basic materials, and repair any organic damage and provide immortality, amongst other abilities; nightmarish nanoweapons are also devised. See nanopunk. See also grey goo.
3. in science fiction milieux and gaming milieux, a type of unobtainium used to explain plot points and special abilities (without really explaining them). Ex: “I fly to the top of the tower.” “Uh huh. How does your cyber-merc have flight abilities?” “He has nanites in his bloodstream.” Which lets him fly how?” “It’s nanotechnology! It can do anything!”

Addendum: Famous examples of nanotechnology in popular culture include the “liquid metal” in Terminator 2: Judgment Day and the Borg nanoprobes from the Star Trek franchise.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

narrator

pl. n. narrators
1. in general usage, one who tells a story in speech or writing or by means of images; one who gives an account of events.
2. in White Wolf’s Mind’s Eye Theatre LARP system, a player who acts as an assistant to the storyteller, helping to resolve game actions but not privy to storyteller plot information.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

natural

pl. n. naturals
1. adj., describes a number produced by a die roll, that has not been altered by adjustments or modifiers such as bonuses or minuses. Ex: GM: “You don’t even need the +2 to-hit adjustment — you rolled two tens, a natural twenty, which is a critical hit.” Newbie: “Huh?” Also unadjusted.
2. n., the die roll itself. Ex: Look! I rolled two naturals! 

Submitted by:

Kunochan

natural 20

ThinkGeek's Critical Hit LED D20 Die -- it lights up when you roll a 20.n., rolling a result of 20 on a 20-sider (ignoring all die modifiers — rolling a natural 17 and adding a +3 modifier would not count); in AD&D, rolling a natural 20 scored a critical hit.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

natural armor

Just because you have craploads of natural armor, doesn't mean you can't wear spiked knuckles and kneepads!also natural armour; pl. n. natural armor; adj. naturally armored
n. in gaming milieux (typically fantasy, science fiction or supers), a physical or magical defense against damage that is part of a creature’s body or that the creature was born with; examples include tough/thick skin, bone or chitinous plating, heavy fur, bone protrusions, and various magical or scientifical effects such as force shields (if they are projected naturally by the creature). See armor, armor class.

 

Submitted by:

Kunochan

natural weapon

The unicorns from the original D&D Monster Manual will attack you with their obvious natural weapons — Glock pistols hidden beneath their haunches.pl. n. natural weapons
in Dungeons & Dragons, d20 games, and certain other games with combat systems, weapons that are part of the body of a monster, creature, or character, as opposed to weapons that are separate objects carried by the combatant; examples would include a Dire Elk’s antlers or a dragon’s claws, but usu. not magical attacks such as breath weapons; such creatures are usually considered always armed, and do not have to expend actions or rounds to arm themselves; term seems to first appear in the 2nd ed. D&D rules; c. 1989. See also natural armor.

Nazi™

The actual game piece that started the hullabaloo.pl. n. Nazis™
1. p.n., nickname for members of the National Socialist German Workers Party, which usurped constitutional government in Germany from 1933-45, and advocated totalitarian fascism, violent territorial expansion, genocide against slavs and Jews, systematic murder of intellectuals, actual socialists, gays and the handicapped, and pseudo-scientific misinterpretation of Indo-European Studies.
2. the generic bad guys in the Indiana Jones RPG, as “copyrighted” by TSR.

Addendum: TSR never copyrighted the word “Nazi.” The inclusion of the “™” symbol after the word Nazi in the Indiana Jones RPG was a simple typo. However, gamers around the world noticed, and one of the most beloved and enduring myths of gamer folklore was born. It should be noted that while TSR never copyrighted “Nazi,” they became Copyright Nazis with the rise of the Web, claiming to have copyrighted jargon like “Armor Class” and “To Hit.” Ha ha ha. Fortunately Wizards of the Coast didn’t continue this nonsense.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

Necronomicon, The

The Necronomicon in the Evil Dead movies.1. p.n., in the fiction works of horror writer HP Lovecraft (1890-1937), a supernatual tome containing occult history and magic that can drive a person insane by reading it; a staple of Lovecraftian Mythos stories and the Evil Dead trilogy.
2. a New Age/occultist fabrication of Lovecraft’s Necronomicon originally “edited” by George Hay and publ. 1978; a second ed. was “edited” by Ed Simon in1995; on Amazon.
3. used to describe any powerful or scary book of magic; players usually have mixed feelings about finding one of these, much less reading it. See tome, grimoire.

Addendum (def. #2): Some people actually argue over whether this fabrication of a fictional book, just a poor rehashing of Mesopotamian mythology with ideas from Lovecraft and Aleister Crowley stuck in, is actually “real” or not. You can see them argue on amazon.com. Pathetic.

Submitted by:

Mark Whitley, Kunochan

need-before-greed

n., in role-playing games, a system of distributing treasure or loot that assigns items based on which player character could gain the greatest use from the item; opposite of free-for-all. Originally a video game term.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

nerf

v. to nerf, nerfing, nerfed
to reduce the capabilities of one or more of the player character classes in an MMORPG; performed by the administrators of the game, usu. to restore play balance; the phrase is used with no small degree of derision, and it tends to happen annoyingly often. Ex.: “They nerfed the necromancer’s Feign Death spell again. I’m writing a complaint to Verant, damn it.”

Addendum: Named for the company that produces soft, spongy footballs, baseballs, darts, etc.

Addendum #2: The origin of the term “nerf” was in Ultima Online. When Origin decreased the effectiveness of all weapons across the board, people joked that they had all been given nerf weapons. The term then migrated to EverQuest, since the development team spent more time making characters weaker than doing almost anything else. It’s in pretty common usage for any MMORPG now, though.

Submitted by:

Brian A. LaBounty

netrunner

pl. n. netrunners
syn. for decker.

Submitted by:

Mark Whitley

neutral evil

Life's not fair, is it? You see, I... well, I shall never be king. And you... shall never see the light of another day. Hmm-hmm-hmm, adieu. n., adj., in Dungeons & Dragons, the alignment of a character that serves the forces of evil, and is willing to follow the law, or break it, in order to do evil. See also lawful goodneutral goodchaotic goodlawful neutraltrue neutralchaotic neutrallawful evilchaotic evil.

Addendum: Sometimes referred to as Pure Evil or True Evil, the neutral evil character’s motivation is the pursuit of his or her own wealth and power at the expense of all others; and they will exploit or ignore law and order to accomplish their goals. This alignment implies ruthlessness, but not necessarily malevolence.

Like other evil alignments, you’re going to have trouble incorporating a neutral evil character into a party that isn’t all evil.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

neutral good

Kaylee! What the hell is goin' on in the engine room? Were there monkeys? Some terrifying space monkeys maybe got loose?n., adj., in Dungeons & Dragons, the alignment of a character that serves the forces of good, and is willing to follow the law, or break it, in order to do good. See also lawful goodchaotic goodlawful neutraltrue neutralchaotic neutrallawful evilneutral evilchaotic evil.

Addendum: The neutral good character is free to pursue what he or she considers right or proper, without being bound to kings, governments, tradition, or even propriety. If law and order promote what is best, then the neutral good character will support law and order — but when the law becomes repressive, and order ignores or supports that repression, the neutral good character will turn scofflaw and rebel, happy to bring chaos if the end result is benevolent.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

newbie

n00b!pl. n. newbies; also n00b, noobzn00bie, newb
n., (“noo bee”) pejorative, a player who is new to gaming. See munchkin, noobie beggar.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

newtype

Gundam cosplay.pl. n. newtypes, also p.n. Newtype
1. n. Japanese ニュータイプ nyutaipu, in the long-running anime series Mobile Suit Gundam, an “advanced human” with psionic powers and superhuman mecha-piloting skills.
2. in anime/mecha RPGs, a character with psi powers, especially one with good mecha-piloting skills.
3. Newtype: The Moving Pictures Magazine, a glossy Japanese-language anime publication often collected by American anime otaku; available at Japanese-language bookstores.

Submitted by:

Andrew Dynon, Kunochan