pagan

Mom? Dad? Did you notice me yet?pl. n. pagans; adj. pagan; also Paganism
1. n. “pay’ gann,” in general usage, pejorative Christian term for a follower of a polytheistic or ethnic, non-Abrahamic religion; as an adj., describes the follower and their beliefs (“a pagan god“); from Latin paganus “rustic, unlearned person,” pagus “countryside”; c. 14th century. Also polytheism, shamanism, pantheism, animism.
2. p.n., term used by a variety of modern New Age religious groups to refer to their bespoke blend of post-Theosophical spiritualism and pre-Christian European animism; c. 1960s. Also neopaganism, modern paganism. See wiccaÁsatrú.

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Kunochan

paladin

A paladin in Pathfinder.pl. n. paladins, D&D-ism
1. in general usage, a trusted military leader (as for a medieval prince); a leading champion of a cause; French, from Italian paladino, from Medieval Latin palatinus “courtier,” from Late Latin, “imperial official”; c. 1590.
2. one of the original character classes from Advanced Dungeons & Dragons; a subclass of the standard fighter class with increased abilities but alignment restrictions.
3. any powerful, good-oriented “knight-type” character in a fantasy RPG. Also anti-paladin, an evil paladin-like character.

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Kunochan

paleogamer

Even Wil Wheaton is a paleogamer.pl. n. paleogamers; n. paleogame; v. to paleogame
1. n., a gamer who has been gaming since before 1985; from paleolithic (“old stone”). See paleotaku.
2. n. paleogame, any game, usu. from a micropress, published before 1985; also a game supplement or milieu that is obviously designed for original D&D or AD&D.
3. a game product that appears to have been published before the widespread use of desktop publishing software.

Submitted by:

Kunochan, J.P. Williamson

paleotaku

A paleotaku.n., an anime enthusiast who has been involved in collecting and trading anime and manga since before 1990, i.e. since before it became “cool”; from paleo (“old”) + otaku.

Addendum: You kids today, with your anime and manga at the freaking Barnes & Noble. Back in my day, we had to go to crummy shops in Little Tokyo, or bum VHS copies of laserdisks — unsubtitled laserdisks, which we watched while reading fan translations printed off Usenet — off somebody who knew somebody who flew to Tokyo every six months to buy anime.

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Kunochan

paper-and-pencil game

n., syn. of tabletop role-playing game.

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Kunochan

paper-thin walls

Paper thin walls.sing. n. paper-thin wall
pl. n., a feature of poorly-designed maps of structures (such as dungeons), where the designer drew lines to represent walls, but did not take into account that walls have thickness. Also crepe-paper walls, paper walls.

Addendum: A common mistake made by newbies, gleefully pointed out by veterans. Such concerns are a remnant of the wargamer and dungeon crawl eras in RPGs, when detailed maps were created on graph or hex paper and used as a base for placing lead miniatures.

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Kunochan

Paranoia

Paranoia.p.n., Paranoia, the Role-Playing Game of A Darkly Humorous Future, a comedic science fiction RPG orginally created by Dan Gelber, Greg Costikyan, & Eric Goldberg; published by West End Games in 1984, with a 2nd ed. in 1987. The “Fifth Edition” (it was really the third, ha ha) was published in 1995. Another edition was released by Mongoose Publishing in 2004. On Amazon.

Addendum: Paranoia won the HG Wells Award for Best RPG of 1984 at Origins ’85. In fact, I can state unequivocally that Paranoia was the Best Role-Playing Game of All Time. If you do not agree, I guess you are entitled to your opin <text error> <text error> attention: you have accessed a restricted HTML parse; security clearance *ultraviolet*. (Please note that there is no *ultraviolet* clearance -- knowledge of the existence of *ultraviolet* clearance is available only to personnel of *ultraviolet* clearance). By reading this text, you have committed an act of treason against Your Friend, The Computer. Please report to the nearest termination booth. Please note: as of 24/35/128 Y.C., all termination booths in infrared sectors feature a NEW, MINTY AROMA. Enjoy! <end of parse>

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Kunochan

parlor LARP

pl. n. parlor LARPs
n., syn. for theater style LARP. Source.

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Kunochan

party

A D&D character party, planning their next adventure.pl. n. parties, D&D-ism
1. a person or group participating in an action or affair (“a mountain-climbing party”); a detail of soldiers; from Middle English partie “group,” Old French partir “to divide,” Latin partre “part”; c. 1800.
2. in role-playing games, a group of player characters who act and travel together; also character party. See party cohesion.

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Kunochan

party cohesion

n., in RPGs, the ability of the player characters in a party (and often, the actual players in the  game) to cooperate constructively and avoid competition and in-fighting. Ex: Player 1: “While Sir Goodalot is asleep, I’m going to pick his pockets.” Player 2: “Dammit, Jerry, if you don’t stop fucking with the party cohesion, my dwarf is gonna kick your ass!”

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Kunochan

Pathfinder

Naked Dinosaur Chick, from Pathfinder.abbrev. PFRPG
p.n., Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, a tabletop fantasy role-playing game published in 2009 by Paizo Publishing; based on the Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 rules published by Wizards of the Coast, under the Open Game License; introduces rules changes and its own game world; many of the game materials are available online. On Amazon.

Addendum: In many gaming circles, Pathfinder has become more popular than D&D (certainly more popular than D&D 4.0).


Submitted by:

Kunochan

patron deity

From the original D&D Deities & Demigods supplement: Loki, patron deity of troublemakers, and people who wear tight shirts.pl. n. patron deities
1. n., in religious mythology, syn. for tutelary deity, the guardian or protector spirit of a person, place, or thing; also genius, daimon, patron saint, guardian angel, kami, power animal.
2. in Dungeons & Dragons and derivative fantasy role-playing games, the specific god who grants a cleric or other divine spellcaster their power; the cleric must serve the god, and be of the same or similar alignment; if the cleric fails to please the god or changes alignment, he or she may lose their thaumaturgic abilities.

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Kunochan

patzer

pl. n. patzers
1. n., in general usage, an inept chess player; from German patzer “bungler,” c.1959.
2. any inept game player; a bonehead. Ex: You sent your one marine in to clear the genestealer nest? You’re such a patzer!

Submitted by:

Kunochan

PBM

pl. n. PBMs
abbrev. “play by mail”; a game in which players communicate their turns via snailmail; also PBEM or PBeM “play by e-mail”; in the UK, PBP “play by post.”

Addendum: PBM is the general term, even for play by e-mail — a throwback to those ancient days, long ago, when only academic administrators and missile silo jockeys had e-mail, and the rest of us had to use the postal service. PBMs were popularized with turn-based board games like chess and Conquest; with the advent of e-mail, playing with or against other gamers across vast distances became even easier, and PBM RPGs became feasible.

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Kunochan

PC

abbrev. player character.” See also NPC.

Submitted by:

Kunochan

PC advantage

pl. n. PC advantages
n., in role-playing games, the power possessed by player characters that allows them to survive and become powerful when other,  identical non-player characters would not. See PC halo.

Addendum: While not actually a game mechanic (in most systems), this refers to the fact that PCs tend to gather EP faster than any other characters around them, are never chosen to die randomly as a plot device, and are usually given much more leeway in terms of what is and is not survivable.

Addendum#2: This principle also seems to be at work in most sci-fi/fantasy drama. The main characters are almost always more competent than those around them, and always manage to perform one-in-a-million feats on a weekly basis.

Submitted by:

Kunochan, Matthew Cary

PC halo

pl. n. PC halos
n., in role-playing games, putatively, a mystical golden light surrounding the heads of player characters, and visible only to other characters who wear the PC halo, indicating the character has the gods’ favor; a convenient excuse some gamemasters use for players to encourage their characters make initial contact, interact, form a party, team up for the imminent bar brawl, etc. Ex: The tavern is very crowded with local townspeople. But you do see an unusual looking gentleman in wizard’s robes at a corner table, and you see he’s wearing a PC halo. Oh, the halfling in leather armor sitting at the bar has a PC halo too. Also PC tattoo, PC shirt. See PC advantage.

Addendum: This is a sloppy and sometimes tongue-in-cheek way for the GM to get the players to gather as a group, but it’s appropriate in a beer-and-pretzels game where the players and GM want to get to the first fight quickly. See metagaming.

Submitted by:

Brian Curtis

Pedo mellon a minno

phrase, “Say ‘friend’ and enter,” from Elven Sindarin; used by Tolkien fans and gamers as a greeting or an invitation to enter; the correct response is “mellon.” See also Namárië, Elen síla lúmenn omentielvo.

Addendum: From The Lord of the Rings, Book II, Chapter 4 “A Journey In The Dark,” from the Elvish inscription on the Dwarvish doors of Moria. Sometimes also “Speak, friend, and enter” (this is how Gandalf initially mistranslates the phrase).

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Kunochan

pegasus

Jeez, fella, could you wear lighter armor? I'm trying to fly here!pl. n. pegasi; adj. Pegasian (“puh gay see un”); p.n. Pegasus
1. p.n., in Greek mythology, an equine god, the son of Poseidon and Medusa (he sprang from her blood when Perseus slew her), taking the form of a white horse with bird wings extending from his sides; he was born by a spring or well, and everywhere he stepped, a spring burst from the earth; from Latin Pegasus, Greek Pegasos, from Greek pege “spring, well”; c. 14th century.
2. n., in modern usage, any notional winged horse; the plural pegasi, although technically incorrect (it would be actually be pegasuses), is common; note there is an actual correct word for “winged horse,” pterippus (pl. pterippi); c. 20th century.
3. in modern fantasy media and gaming milieux, a winged horse, often employed as a flying steed.
4. p.n., a third generation video game console system, an unauthorized clone of the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), manufactured in Taiwan and sold in Poland, Serbia, and Bosnia.

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Kunochan

percentile dice

On the left, the "ones" -- on the right, the "tens."sing. n. percentile die
pl n., dice used to produce a number from one to one-hundred when thrown, often to check against a percentage chance of success; usu. two ten-sided or two-twenty-sided dice, with one die designated “tens” and the other designated “ones”; also 2d10.

Submitted by:

Kunochan