Überplot

pl. n. Überplots
n., the single most important, dominant, or over-arching plot line or story line in a role-playing campaign. Source.

Addendum: “‘Going in search of the Uberplot’ is a metagame phrase referring to the tendency of some players to involve themselves as much as possible with these ‘central’ elements of a game, regardless of their characters’ plausible connections to it.”

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Kunochan

umber hulk

An umber hulk riding a bulette. Your argument is invalid.pl. n. umber hulks
in Dungeons & Dragons, an intelligent, monstrous creature resembling a large ape + insect chimera; the monster can magically confuse any foe that meets its four-eyed gaze; also vodyanoi (aquatic umber hulk), hulker, undead hulktruly horrid umber hulkdark umber hulk, psi-hulkshadow hulk; included as a player character race in 3rd ed.; from umber “dark yellowish-brown” + hulk “big fella”; c. 1974.

Addendum: Another iconic monster created for D&D.

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Kunochan

undead

An undead army in miniatures.adj., describing a corpse that has been reanimated through supernatural means; vampires, zombies, ghouls, skeletons, liches, etc.; also coll. p. n. The Undead.

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Kunochan

undine

An undine from the PlayStation game Tales of Eternia.pl. n. undines; p.n. Undine; also ondine
1. in Renaissance alchemy, a water elemental or nymph; they are soulless, but gain a soul when they marry a mortal and carry his child; from Latin unda “wave” + ine “made of,” Proto- Indo-European wed “water, wet”; c. 16th century.
2. in modern fantasy media and gaming milieux, syn. with mermaid.

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Kunochan

unicorn

Mmmmm. Tastes like virgin.pl. n. unicorns
1. in Greek folklore and later in European folklore, a magical animal, a white horse with a single, long, straight, spiraling horn emerging from its forehead, and the beard and cloven hooves of a goat; a symbol of purity, it could only be captured by a virgin; its horn was believed to have magic powers; from 1175–1225; word sometimes used by medieval translators for Biblical Hebrew re’em (a better translation would be auroch); also alicorn (winged unicorn); from Middle English unicorne, Latin ūnicornis, uni “one” + corn “horn”; calque of Greek monoceros; c. 12th century.
2. in Dungeons & Dragons, one of the original monsters, closely modeled after the unicorn of European mythology; they are chaotic good protectors of woodlands, and can speak; they are protected from most evil spells, and can teleport once a day; c. 1974. Also black unicorn (an evil unicorn, a mount for drow elves), shadow unicornalicorn, bay unicorn, black unicorn, brown unicorn, cunnequine, faerie unicorn, gray unicorn, palomino unicorn, pinto unicorn, sea unicorn, unisus, zebracorn. See also hippocampus.
3. in the MMORPG World of Warcraft, horned equine mounts; varieties include the zhevra (zebra unicorn), celestial charger unicorn, hornsaw unicornQuel’dorei steed.
4. in the Final Fantasy video game series, a magical animal that cures player character damage.

Addendum: In many occult and fantasy milieux, unicorn horn (whole or powdered) is a powerful spell component. Unicorn encounters are relatively rare in fantasy RPGs, simply because they’re not widely seen as something you fight, but rather something the party encounters as a sign or portent. GM: “The majestic unicorn emerges from the woods and, meeting your gaze, gestures with its head towards the sacred standing stones.” Player: “Great. Can we kill it?”

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Kunochan

unit

Miniatures as units in a wargame. Each unit represents multiple soldiers, but fights as one piece.pl. n. units
1. in general usage, one of the individuals, people or items, that together constitute a whole or group; one of the parts or elements into which a whole may be divided; one of a number of items or persons that are identical or equivalent in function or form; Middle English unit, coined by the occultist John Dee, translation of Greek mónas “unity”: c. 1570.
2. in wargames, and sometimes in other games that simulate combat, any single, indivisible fighting component, piece, or miniature; may represent a single fighter or combat machine/vehicle, or a group, but in the context of the game mechanics, the unit operates as a singular entity.

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Kunochan

unobtainium

Should have been called Have-to-murder-big-blue-natives-to-obtainium.pl. ; adj. pl. unobtainium; adj. unobtainium-like
1. n., in engineering and Physics, a fictional, impossible-to-obtain material that would be required to build a hypothesized structure or perform an imagined experiment; from un- “not” + obtain “get” + ium (common suffix for elements). Also wishalloy. Ex: But you couldn’t fly the ship into the black hole and survive, you’d need an unobtainium hull.
2. in science fiction fandom, the sci-fi writing community, and role-playing games, refers to any material, object or plot device that explains the ability of characters or fictional technology to perform feats that are impossible in modern science; also handwaviumphlebotinum, eludium, bogosity generator. Ex: “How does the mech’s levitation work?” “I dunno, it’s got unobtainium coils in its flange assembly. Stop asking stupid questions.”

Addendum: This word was apparently invented by engineers in the 1950s, and was later appropriated by the sci-fi community. Unobtainium came to general pop-culture prominence when it was employed as a plot device in the 2009 film Avatar; its use in that movie led to a great deal of ridicule of the term.

“Phlebotinum” was apparently coined by a writer for the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Other terms used in science fiction and fantasy as a form of unobtainium include, in alphabetical order, adamantium, alicorncavorite, cold irondark matter, liftwoodmithril, nanotechnologyneutroniumorichalcum, plasteel, red matterrodiniumscrith, tiberiumtitanium-Atransparent aluminum, and vibranium.

 

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Kunochan