vampire

From the upcoming (maybe) World of Darkness MMORPG.pl. n. vampires; adj. vampiric; v. to vamp, vamping, to vamp out, vamping out; n. vampirism
1. in Eastern European folk mythology, the reanimated body of a dead person believed to rise from the grave at night and suck the blood of sleeping victims; French, from German Vampir, from Serbo-Croatian vampir; 18th c.
2. in modern fantasy and occult fiction, a variety of monster inspired by the eponymous character of Dracula, written by Irish author Bram Stoker (1847-1912). Also revenant, leech, ghoul, vrykolakas, strigoi, nachzehrer, nightwalker, blutsauger, blooddrinker, nightcrawler, anthropophagus.
3. in fantasy and occult game milieux, undead creatures based on the vampires of fiction; examples of games with vampires include Dungeons & Dragons and Vampire: The Masquerade.
4. In the Twilight books of author Stephanie Meyer, some kind of sparkling douchebag.
5. refers to members of a sub-cultural movement composed of borderline psychotics who imagine that they are actual vampires, either imitating vampire behavior through dress and consuming small quantities of human blood, or by adopting a “New Age” belief system in which they draw “psychic energy” from others.

Addendum: The original Eastern European vampire, a shambling mindless ghoul reanimated by sins in life and who feeds on flesh, has little to do with the frill-shirted Romantic sophisticates sipping blood from crystal wine goblets popularized by Anne Rice and her imitators. Even the ultra-sensitivity to sunlight is a recent invention, which does not exist in Stoker’s writings. An excellent academic account of the origins of the vampire myth is Vampires, Burial, and Death: Folklore and Reality by Paul Barber.

Addendum #2: Players of the Vampire: The Masquerade RPG, and in particular players of the Vampire LARP, should never be confused with the nutcases of definition #5. Vampire LARPS are not vampire cults. Vampire LARP players do not believe they are really vampires. An individual’s attraction to occult RPGs bears no correlation to their actual level of belief in the occult; as a matter of fact, an actual occultist (if there is such a thing) might find occult RPGs to be insulting.

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Kunochan

Vampire: The Masquerade

Characters from Vampire: The Masquerade.abbrev. V:TM
p.n., occult “gothic-punk” tabletop role-playing game published by White Wolf Games; originally created by Mark Rein•Hagen; also Vampire: The Dark Ages, the LARP Mind’s Eye Theatre: Laws of the Night, and the computer game Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines; there was also a 1996 TV show based on V:TM, Kindred: The Embraced. On Amazon. See also Werewolf: The Apocalypse, World of Darkness.

Addendum: The game improves on earlier, less interesting occult RPGs like Call of Cthulhu by stealing liberally from the novels of Anne Rice, and focusing the game not on the adventures of “good guy” occult investigators, but on the vampires themselves and their byzantine inter-clan politics. V:TM is one of six “core” games in the World of Darkness series.

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Kunochan

video game

Well, if you were gonna post some sexy Lara Croft cosplay, what entry would YOU post it under?pl. n. video games, gerund video gaming; also n. videogame, pl. n. videogames, v. to videogame, videogaming, videogamed
see computer game.

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Kunochan

video game addiction

Jenkins.pl. n. video game addictions; also Video Game Addiction
a supposed mental illness or personality disorder that causes a person to play computer games compulsively, isolating the person from others and negatively impacting their life. See video game.

Addendum: This nonsense started in the 1970s with Space Invaders, and has been going on ever since. Spend hundreds of hours watching sports or quilting blankets, and you’re “normal”; devote a lot of time to computer games and you’re “sick.”

In fact, there exists no formal diagnosis of “video game addiction” in medical or psychological literature; and it was rejected for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The only people who ever bring up this invented illness are people who want to prey on the fears of parents — religiously-motivated “culture war” busybodies and unscrupulous politicians.

Can a person harm themselves by over-committing to video games? Of course. Are video games designed to be addictive? Yes. But do video games possess some magical property that renders them addictive the way heroin is addictive? The science says no. And is Blizzard Entertainment at fault when you blow off work to play Mists of Pandaria? Common sense says no, that’s all on you.

 

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Kunochan

vidya

Know Your Meme.pl. n. vidyas, vidya gaems
in Internet leetspeak, especially on 4chan, short for vidya gaem; from English video game. See also own.

Addendum: Know Your Meme says this originated in an episode of King of the Hill.

viking

A fantasy viking miniature.pl. n. vikings; adj. viking; p.n. Viking Age
1. in general usage, Scandinavian sea-faring explorers, merchants and pirates of the late 8th to mid-11th centuries; often used to refer to all Scandinavians, Icelanders and Greenlanders of that historical period, whether technically vikings or not; p.n., that period in European history; from Old Norse vikingr, vik “bay” + ing “person.
2. in gaming milieux, barbarian characters inspired by historical vikings. Games featuring vikings include the board games VikingsYggdrasil, and Small World; the role-playing games GURPS VikingsViking Age for the d20 System, and Ragnarok: Tales of the Norse Gods; there are also the Vendel and Vesten in 7th Sea and the Get of Fenris in Werewolf: The Apocalypse.

Addendum: Historical vikings did not wear horns on their helmets. Ever.

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Kunochan

viking game

pl. n. viking games
n., refers to any circumstance in which gamers are evicted from one gaming venue, often a high school or university classroom, and must wander around as a group lugging their gaming materials until they find another place to play. See viking; see also lunchroom game.

Addendum: So named because of the common fantasy of the gamers involved, that they can travel as a pack until they find the perfect location, then kill everyone in that location and take possession of it.

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Kunochan

vorpal

The vorpal sword in Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland.also vorpal sword, vorpal swords
1. adj., the type of sword carried by the hero of the poem “Jabberwocky,” from Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There by Lewis Carroll; nonsense word invented by Carroll; coined 1871.
2. in D&D, a sword that always decapitates when it hits. Ex: I decapitate Asmodeus with my vorpal sword.
3. a prefix or descriptive to indicate that something does a great deal of damage. Ex: Every game he gets a paper cut. It’s like he’s got a vorpal character sheet or something.

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Kunochan

vorpal bunny

That rabbit's dynamite!pl. n. vorpal bunnies
n., name applied to any seemingly harmless, but actually quite lethal creature. Ex: Kobolds that have magic resistance and shoot fireballs? What’s next, vorpal bunnies? Also killer rabbit, killer bunny. See vorpal.

Addendum: inspired by the Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog in Terry Gilliam & Terry Jones’ 1975 classic Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

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Kunochan